Oneida Nation Embraces Aquaponics

The Oneida Nation uses a Micro Farm 1 from Nelson and Pade, Inc. to grow fresh fish and vegetables for members of the tribe and Oneida School System. The fish and vegetables contribute to healthier food choices and enhanced nutrition.

Today two Green Bay news stations showcased this excellent effort:

ABC 2 Green Bay – Oneida Feature

We are Green Bay – Oneida Feature

ONEIDA, Wis. (WBAY-TV) Oneida Nation harvested the first fish from its aquaponics system Wednesday.  The tribe used a USDA Farm to School Grant to build the program in 2016.
Inside the snow covered greenhouse lies a warm environment for Oneida Nation’s aquaponics system.  It’s a connected mechanism where food, tanks, pipes, and lights create a system for fish and veggies to grow.
“We’re in a recirculating system of water where our fish benefit our plants,” Kristy Krenke, Oneida Nation Training and Outreach Intern said. “Our plants in turn will clean our water for our fish.”

There’s about 70 tilapia per tank and it takes about 26 weeks before the fish are ready to be harvested. Oneida Nation is primarily focused on utilizing the lettuce saying, in full production, more than 100 heads of lettuce can be produced a week. “We’re in Wisconsin, winter is a hard one, where not a lot of fresh food is available locally,” said Krenke. The lettuce that is grown is part of the salad bar at Oneida Nation High School. “We would like to see all of our lettuce be utilized at the school and we would like to see the school just purchasing our lettuce,” said Krenke.

On Wednesday, veterans from the tribe had fish tacos. Using the lettuce along with the tilapia from the aquaponics system.
“I’ve never had it, it’s kind of like perch a little bit,” Michael Hill, a Navy Veteran said. “It’s good, I like it.”

Nelson and Pade lettuce served up fresh on UW-SP campus

The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Dining Services now offers local aquaponic lettuce at the deli line and salad bar in the Dreyfus University Center, and the salad bar at Upper Debot.

This lettuce is grown just over 60 miles south of campus at Nelson and Pade Inc. in Montello, Wisconsin. Aquaponic lettuce was first offered to students at these locations last semester and since then has grown in popularity.

Angel Alcantar, assistant director of culinary operations on campus, says that demand is so great at Upper Debot, that the University now purchases 192 heads of aquaponic lettuce a week for that location alone. Alcantar said that the dining services buys aquaponic lettuce to reflect the student body’s desire for a more sustainable campus.

Read the full article

Aquaponics lures Wisconsin’s youth into farming

Intern Colton Branville harvests saugeyes after a year reared in various aquaponics systems at the UWSP. Younger people are especially intrigued by aquaponics’ sustainability as a method for food production, says UWSP professor of Fisheries and Biology, Chris Hartleb

Aquaponics’ green credentials and sustainability is attracting Winconsin’s young generation into farming, says Chris Hartleb, professor of Fisheries Biology at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point (UWSP).

Hartleb, who follows the state’s aquaculture industry, says an influx of newer, younger fish farm owners and the rapid rise of aquaponic farms is spurring industry growth. “Generally, the growth of Wisconsin’s aquaculture industry has been stagnant for the past 10 years with as many new businesses opening as others closing,” he tells Aquaculture North America (ANA).

In collaboration with aquaponics industry leader Nelson and Pade Inc, the Aquaponics Master Class has now educated over 1,400 students from over 101 countries and all 50 states since the course began in 1997.

See full article

Nelson and Pade, Inc.® Awarded 2017 “Sustainable Product of the Year”

Montello, WI – The Wisconsin Sustainable Business Council awarded Nelson and Pade, Inc.® with the Sustainable Product of the Year Award for small business. This is the second time that this prestigious honor was presented to Nelson and Pade, Inc.®, recognizing their Clear Flow Aquaponic Systems®.

Tom Eggert, Executive Director of the WI Sustainability Council (middle), presenting the 2017 Sustainable Product of the Year Award to John Pade and Rebecca Nelson, co-founders of Nelson and Pade, Inc.

The award was presented at the 2017 Sustainable Business Awards Celebration at Inpro Corporation. Rebecca Nelson, co-founder of Nelson and Pade, Inc.®, shares “We are truly honored to have been nominated and awarded the Sustainable Product of the Year Award in both 2014 and 2017.  This recognition demonstrates our commitment to sustainability in Wisconsin and around the world.“

Nelson and Pade, Inc.® is the most trusted name in aquaponics, an innovative method of food production that combines aquaculture (fish farming) and hydroponics (soilless plant culture). In aquaponics, microbes naturally convert the waste from fish farming into an all-natural fertilizer for plant culture. Nelson and Pade, Inc.’s Clear Flow Aquaponic Systems® are designed to maximize these natural processes to grow fresh fish and vegetables year ‘round in any climate.  To date, Clear Flow Aquaponic Systems® are used by individuals, entrepreneurs, schools, Universities and food banks in almost 30 countries.

Clear Flow Aquaponic Systems® at the Nelson and Pade, Inc.® demonstration greenhouse in Montello, Wisconsin.

Nelson and Pade, Inc.’s Clear Flow Aquaponic Systems® with ZDEP® (Zero Discharge/Extra Production) have revolutionized the aquaponics industry, providing users with a science-based, proven and profitable aquaponic system. They are highly productive and continually produce fresh fish and vegetables, 365 days/year, without the use of pesticides, herbicides or chemical fertilizers. Two US patents are held by Nelson and Pade, Inc.® for their innovative designs.

When comparing lettuce production using 1 acre of Clear Flow Aquaponic Systems® to 1 acre of lettuce farming in the Gila Valley, Arizona, Nelson and Pade, Inc.’s systems grow 6 times more lettuce per acre using 1/6 of the water on an annual basis. The same system also produces 40,000 lbs. of fish. These systems are energy efficient as well, with a majority of the water flow achieved through gravity.

Nelson and Pade, Inc.® has its business campus in Montello, WI, where the systems, 90% made in the USA, are manufactured. Also on site is a state-of-the-art 14,000-sq. ft. greenhouse facility which houses commercial aquaponic systems for demonstration, a large classroom and the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point: Aquaponics Innovation Center.  Tours of the facility are available.

In addition to manufacturing systems, Nelson and Pade, Inc.® also offers the Nelson and Pade Grower Program and the Aquaponics Master Class®, which has been attended by individuals from over 100 countries.

For more information, visit www.aquaponics.com or contact Nelson and Pade, Inc., PO Box 761, Montello, WI  53949, USA, 608-297-8708, info@aquaponics.com

Aquaponics: The Future of Farming

Nelson and Pade, Inc.® is featured in the Summer 2017 edition of Harrowsmith magazine.

What does every kid learn in school? That to grow anything, you need seed, soil, water and sun. But what if you removed soil from the equation? Wouldn’t the possibilities be almost endless?

And now that’s becoming a reality. A form of agriculture that combines aquaculture (fish farming) with hydroponics (growing plants in water), aquaponics is an interesting alternative for cold-weather nations like ours, as well as urban centers and community growers, as Ontario’s Mississauga Food Bank is showing.

“I read an article online about a year ago about aquaponics, and realized it had potential to help solve a challenge at the food bank,” says Christopher Hatch, executive director of The Mississauga Food Bank. After more research, Hatch hired Wisconsin-based aquaponics consulting firm Nelson and Pade, Inc. to help him set up a system at his facility. “I like the idea of growing year-round in Canada, with our weather, and it being so cold in winter,” says Hatch. “This way, we can grow in the warehouse and control the environment.”.

Read the full article

Lakeland University and Nelson and Pade Bring Aquaponics to Malawi

Four Lakeland University students, two LU professors and a Lakeland graduate are busy preparing for an incredible collaborative effort, one that will culminate in Africa nearly two months from now.

When completed, this unique student-faculty research and performance project will be responsible for feeding people in the nation of Malawi for years to come through the fascinating technology of aquaponics.

The official title of this two-month initiative is, “The Business of Science: Empowering Entrepreneurship through the Design and Installation of a Start-Up Aquaponics Farm in Malawi, Africa.”

Read the full article in Lakeland Universities, ‘The Blog’.

Edible Madison Features Nelson and Pade, Inc.®

The Summer 2017 Issue of Edible Magazine was recently published, and writer Vanessa Herald has an article titled, “Eating Close to Home with Farm-Raised Fish”, with a feature on Nelson and Pade, Inc.®.

Nelson and Pade is more than just a fish farm; it’s a valuable member of the community. The Montello site is half commercial fishery and half demonstration site to educate an international audience about successful aquaponics production. Everyone from small-scale home producers to future commercial growers participate in tours, classes and the Nelson and Pade Grower Program to learn how to use an aquaponics system with success. The site is also shared by the UW-Stevens Point Aquaponics Innovation Center, researching crop diversification for industry advancement and providing opportunities for students to earn an aquaponics certificate and pursue a profession in the field.

“We’re proud to deliver a high-quality product grown right here,” says Nelson, who knows every input used in their farming system. She knows first-hand their fish are raised in an environment with impeccable water quality and using non-GMO feed. Because of this, she says, “The result is clean, great-tasting fish that is also a choice for sustainability.”

Read the full article

The Future of Farming

Catalina Margulis of the Harrowsmith, written for Canadians by Canadians, recently published an article on ‘The Future of Farming’, featuring Nelson and Pade, Inc. and one of our growers, AquaFarms at The Mississauga Food Bank in Canada.

Marqulis writes:

What does every kid learn in school? That to grow anything, you need seed, soil, water and sun. But what if you removed soil from the equation? Wouldn’t the possibilities be almost endless?

And now that’s becoming a reality. A form of agriculture that combines aquaculture (fish farming) with hydroponics (growing plants in water), aquaponics is an interesting alternative for cold-weather nations like ours, as well as urban centres and community growers, as Ontario’s Mississauga Food Bank is showing.

“I read an article online about a year ago about aquaponics, and realized it had potential to help solve a challenge at the food bank,” says Christopher Hatch, executive director of The Mississauga Food Bank. After more research, Hatch hired Wisconsin-based aquaponics consulting firm Nelson and Pade, Inc. to help him set up a system at his facility. “I liked the idea of growing year-round in Canada, with our weather, and it being so cold in winter,” says Hatch. “This way, we can grow in the warehouse and control the environment.”

“The Mississauga Food Bank is a very innovative use of our technology because it’s using aquaponics to feed people who don’t have fresh food—it’s a great new direction for food banks,” says Rebecca Nelson, co-founder of Nelson and Pade. “We have the longest history and most experience in aquaponics. We provide growers with everything they need, including training, so they can be successful both short and long term.”

Read the full article

Nelson and Pade in The Marquette County Tribune

On May 16th, we welcomed back the STEM Shuttle, operated by the Dream Flight USA Foundation, along with the 5th graders from both Westfield and Montello Elementary Schools. Our sponsorship to the STEM Shuttle allows us the opportunity to annual host a field trip for nearly 90 local 5th grade students, where they get to spend their day participating in hands-on activities aboard the STEM Shuttle and tour our state-of-the-art aquaponics greenhouse facility.